The True Heart of Bravery 

Heart inside house inside mountain…

Refer to this…

and bodhi-heart

Don’t try to push out the nightmare, and don’t try to bring in the bliss. Just rest your being in a state of basic goodness. If necessary, you can actually say to yourself: “Basic goodness.” It will help. Up to this point we’ve been exploring Ashe in the relative sense, how it manifests in our ordinary, everyday experience. At the absolute level, the Ashe principle is nonexistence, which here means being vacant or empty of duality. It is just open space. In the Buddhist tradition, nonexistence is referred to as shunyata. Shunya means “empty,” “not,” or “no.” Ta” makes it “emptiness,” “no-ness,” or “nonexistence.” Nonexistence is always in the background. Either it can be covered up or it can manifest, which allows us to work with this and that, good and bad, in the relative sense. In the Buddhist tradition, as we have discussed, we talk about vajra nature, which is the diamond-like quality of nonexistence that is absolutely indestructible. It does not have any bias toward good or bad. Similarly, the absolute Ashe principle is described as being like a diamond and impossible to destroy. You cannot wound or slash space no matter how sharp your sword may be. In the English language we talk about the hard truth, the hard facts of life. The Ashe principle is the hard facts and the hard truth that cannot be altered. There is nothing mystical about it. If you want to grasp it, it is simple, open, and intangible, but it is very much there. It is no longer regarded as a fanciful, mystical experience. The Ashe is in you; it is in the cosmos. It is universal. It is That. It arises in the form of a razor knife that cuts dualistic preoccupations and concepts of any kind. On the whole, this principle of basic goodness is non-ego, nothing to dwell on anywhere, but utterly sharp and superbly immovable and steady. It is monumental nonexistence. It is the essence of joining heaven and earth.

Bodhi-heart referred to a special quality of devoutness; here, however, in connection with the nectar, it means fluid or secretion--source of energy and compassion.